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Business diagrams & Org Charts with ConceptDraw PRO

Business diagrams & Org Charts with ConceptDraw PRO

The business diagrams are in great demand, they describe the business processes, business tasks and activities which are executed to achieve specific organizational and business goals, increase productivity, reduce costs and errors. They let research and better understand the business processes. ConceptDraw PRO is a powerful professional cross-platform business graphics and business flowcharting tool which contains hundreds of built-in collections of task-specific vector stencils and templates. They will help you to visualize and structure information, create various Business flowcharts, maps and diagrams with minimal efforts, and add them to your documents and presentations to make them successful. Among them are Data flow diagrams, Organization charts, Business process workflow diagrams, Audit flowcharts, Cause and Effect diagrams, IDEF business process diagrams, Cross-functional flowcharts, PERT charts, Timeline diagrams, Calendars, Marketing diagrams, Pyramids, Target diagrams, Venn diagrams, Comparison charts, Analysis charts, Dashboards, and many more. Being a cross-platform application, ConceptDraw PRO is very secure, handy, free of bloatware and one of the best alternatives to Visio for Mac users. Read more
Draw Business Process Diagrams
Draw Business Process Diagrams

Is ConceptDraw PRO an Alternative to Microsoft Visio?

Visio for Mac and Windows - ConceptDraw as an alternative to MS Visio. ConceptDraw PRO delivers full-functioned alternative to MS Visio. ConceptDraw PRO supports import of Visio files. ConceptDraw PRO supports flowcharting, swimlane, orgchart, project chart, mind map, decision tree, cause and effect, charts and graphs, and many other diagram types. Read more
The FTA diagram sample "Fault tree analysis - Insulin delivery system" was redesigned from the illustration of "CMSI 641: Introduction to Software Engineering. Design of Critical Systems. B.J. Johnson. 2005. Loyola Marymount University".
"Another way of assessing hazards is using fault tree analysis. In this process, each of the identified hazards is covered by a detailed analysis to find out what might cause it. Either inductive or deductive reasoning is applied. In the case of software hazards, the usual focus is to determine faults that will cause the system to fail to deliver a system service, such as a monitoring system. A "fault tree" is constructed to link all the possible situations together, to help identify the interrelationships of the failures, which modules may cause them, and what "trickle-down effects" there might be. Here is an example of a fault tree, as applied to the Insulin delivery system from Sommerville...
Note that this tree is only partially complete, since only the potential software faults are shown on the diagram. The potential failures involving hardware, such as low battery, blood monitor or sensor failure, patient over-exertion or inattention, or medical staff failure are noticeable by their absence.
The fault tree and safety specification processes are two ways of helping with system risk assessment tasks. Once the risks are identified, there are other assessments that need to take place. First, the likelihood of the risk occurrance must be assessed. This is often quantifiable, so numbers may be assigned based on things like MTBF, latency effects, and other known entities. There may be other non-quantifiable contributors to the risk likelihood, however, such that these must be assessed and estimated by experts in the domain. (Don't short-change this process when dealing with critical systems!) Finally, the risk assessment must include the severity of the risk, meaning an estimation of the cost to the project in the event the risk item actually does occur. "Cost to the project" means all associated costs, including schedule delays, human injury, damage to hardware, corruption of data, and so on."
[myweb.lmu.edu/bjohnson/cmsi641web/week15-2.html]
The FTA diagram example "Fault tree analysis - Insulin delivery system" was created using the ConceptDraw PRO diagramming and vector drawing software extended with the Fault Tree Analysis Diagrams solution from the Engineering area of ConceptDraw Solution Park. Read more
FTA diagram
FTA diagram, event, OR gate,
This hexagon diagram sample was redesigned from the Wikipedia file: Virtuous circle in macroeconomics.svg. "An example of the use of a virtuous circle in macroeconomics."
[en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Virtuous_circle_in_macroeconomics.svg]
"A virtuous circle and a vicious circle (also referred to as virtuous cycle and vicious cycle) are economic terms. They refer to a complex chain of events that reinforces itself through a feedback loop. A virtuous circle has favorable results, while a vicious circle has detrimental results.
Both circles are complexes of events with no tendency towards equilibrium (at least in the short run). Both systems of events have feedback loops in which each iteration of the cycle reinforces the previous one (positive feedback). These cycles will continue in the direction of their momentum until an external factor intervenes and breaks the cycle. The prefix "hyper-" is sometimes used to describe these cycles if they are extreme. The best-known example of a vicious circle is hyperinflation. ...
Example in macroeconomics.
Virtuous circle.
Economic growth can be seen as a virtuous circle. It might start with an exogenous factor such as technological innovation. As people get familiar with the new technology, there could be learning curve effects and economies of scale. This could lead to reduced costs and improved production efficiencies. In a competitive market structure, this will probably result in lower average prices or a decrease in employment as it takes fewer workers to produce the same output. As prices decrease, consumption could increase and aggregate output also. Increased levels of output lead to more learning and scale effects and a new cycle starts."
[en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Virtuous_circle_and_vicious_circle]
The crystal diagram example "Virtuous circle (macroeconomics)" was created using the ConceptDraw PRO diagramming and vector drawing software extended with the Target and Circular Diagrams solution from the Marketing area of ConceptDraw Solution Park.
www.conceptdraw.com/solution-park/marketing-target-and-circular-diagrams Read more
Hexagon diagram
Hexagon diagram, crystal diagram, hexagon diagram,
"The six markets model.
Christopher, Payne and Ballantyne (1991) from Cranfield University goes further. They identify six markets which they claim are central to relationship marketing. They are: internal markets, supplier markets, recruitment markets, referral markets, influence markets, and customer markets.
Referral marketing is developing and implementing a marketing plan to stimulate referrals. Although it may take months before you see the effect of referral marketing, this is often the most effective part of an overall marketing plan and the best use of resources.
Marketing to suppliers is aimed at ensuring a long-term conflict-free relationship in which all parties understand each other's needs and exceed each other's expectations. Such a strategy can reduce costs and improve quality.
Influence markets involve a wide range of sub-markets including: government regulators, standards bodies, lobbyists, stockholders, bankers, venture capitalists, financial analysts, stockbrokers, consumer associations, environmental associations, and labor associations. These activities are typically carried out by the public relations department, but relationship marketers feel that marketing to all six markets is the responsibility of everyone in the organization. Each market may require its own explicit strategies and a separate marketing mix for each." [Relationship marketing. Wikipedia]
The block diagram example "Six markets model" was created using the ConceptDraw PRO diagramming and vector drawing software extended with the Block Diagrams solution from the area "What is a Diagram" of ConceptDraw Solution Park. Read more
Block diagram
Block diagram, block diagram,

IDEF9 Standard

Use Case Diagrams technology. An effective management of changes is significantly facilitated by way of definition and documenting of business-requirements. Read more

meter dashboard, quantitative indicators Meter Dashboard

meter dashboard, quantitative indicators
Meter dashboard solution extends ConceptDraw PRO software with templates, samples and vector stencils library with meter indicators for drawing visual dashboards showing quantitative data. Read more
HelpDesk

How to Use the Effort-Driven Scheduling Method

Effort-driven scheduling is the default method of project scheduling in ConceptDraw PROJECT. Read more