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Goal line formation (Offense/Defense)

"The goal line is the chalked or painted line dividing the end zone from the field of play in American football and Canadian football. It is the line that must be crossed in order to score a touchdown
If any part of the ball reaches any part of the imaginary vertical plane transected by this line while in-bounds and in possession of a player whose team is striving toward that end of the field, this is considered a touchdown and scores six points for the team whose player has advanced the ball to, or recovered the ball in, this position. This is in contrast with other sports like Association football and ice hockey, which require the puck or ball to pass completely over the goal line to count as a score.
If any member of the offensive team is downed while in possession of the ball behind his own team's goal line, this is called a safety and scores two points for the defensive team.
If, during the course of play, a loose ball travels past the goal line and is recovered within the end zone, then it is a touchdown if recovered by the kicking team, or a touchback if recovered and downed by the receiving team.
In the event of a kick recovered in one's own end zone, the entirety of the ball must pass the goal line in order for the ball to be considered in the field of play, and not a touchback." [Goal line (gridiron football). Wikipedia]
The American football positions diagram example "Goal line formation (Offense/Defense)" was created using the ConceptDraw PRO diagramming and vector drawing software extended with the Football solution from the Sport area of ConceptDraw Solution Park. Read more
American football positions diagram
American football positions diagram, linebackers, LB, defensive tackle, DT, cornerback, CB,
Used Solutions
"In association football, the formation describes how the players in a team are positioned on the pitch. Different formations can be used depending on whether a team wishes to play more attacking or defensive football. ...
4–4–2.
This formation was the most common in football in the 1990s and early 2000s, so well known that it has even inspired a magazine title, FourFourTwo. The midfielders are required to work hard to support both the defence and the attack: typically one of the central midfielders is expected to go upfield as often as possible to support the forward pair, while the other will play a "holding role", shielding the defence; the two wide midfield players must move up the flanks to the goal line in attacks and yet also protect the fullback wide defenders." [Formation (association football). Wikipedia]
The diagram example "Association football (soccer) formation 4-4-2" was created using the ConceptDraw PRO diagramming and vector drawing software extended with the Football solution from the Sport area of ConceptDraw Solution Park.
www.conceptdraw.com/solution-park/sport-soccer Read more
Association football (soccer) formation diagram
Association football (soccer) formation diagram, midfielder, wide midfield, right midfield, right wing, midfielder, wide midfield, right midfield, midfielder, wide midfield, left midfield, left wing, midfielder, centre midfield, goalkeeper, end zone view football field, end zone view soccer field, defender, right-back, full-backs, defender, left-back, full-backs, defender, centre-back, central defender, centre-half, stopper,
Used Solutions
"In association football, the formation describes how the players in a team are positioned on the pitch. Different formations can be used depending on whether a team wishes to play more attacking or defensive football. ...
The WM system was created in the mid-1920s by Herbert Chapman of Arsenal to counter a change in the offside law in 1925. The change had reduced the number of opposition players that attackers needed between themselves and the goal-line from three to two. This led to the introduction of a centre-back to stop the opposing centre-forward, and tried to balance defensive and offensive playing. The formation became so successful that by the late-1930s most English clubs had adopted the WM. Retrospectively, the WM has either been described as a 3–2–5 or as a 3–4–3, or more precisely a 3–2–2–3 reflecting the letters which symbolised it. The gap in the centre of the formation between the two wing halves and the two inside forwards allowed Arsenal to counter-attack effectively. The W-M was subsequently adapted by several English sides, but none could apply it in quite the same way Chapman had. This was mainly due to the comparative rarity of Alex James in the English game. He was one of the earliest playmakers in the history of the game, and the hub around which Chapman's Arsenal revolved." [Formation (association football). Wikipedia]
The diagram example "Association football (soccer) formation 3-2-5 (WM)" was created using the ConceptDraw PRO diagramming and vector drawing software extended with the Football solution from the Sport area of ConceptDraw Solution Park.
www.conceptdraw.com/solution-park/sport-soccer Read more
Association football (soccer) formation diagram
Association football  (soccer) formation diagram, midfielder, wide midfield, right midfield, midfielder, wide midfield, left midfield, left wing, midfielder, centre midfield, goalkeeper, end zone view football field, end zone view soccer field, defender, right-back, full-backs, defender, left-back, full-backs,
Used Solutions