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Organizational culture - Triangle diagram

"At the base of the identity of an organisational is its organizational culture. A culture is comprised of the shared values, customs, traditions, rituals, behaviours and beliefs shared by a social group (national, ethnic, organizational, etc.). Cultures also share languages, or ways of speaking. From a communication perspective, cultures are made and remade through the words we use to describe our world. Culture represents a common set of values (“shared meanings”), shared by members of a population, a organization, a project/programme purpose unit or a profession (e.g., engineers versus scientists). Culture change with the times but the speed at which the culture of different institutions change varies widely." [Development Cooperation Handbook/The development aid organization/Organizational Culture. Wikibooks]
This organizational culture triangle diagram example derived from Parker and Benson's model. It's for explaination of the Regatta: Adoption Method.
The pyramid diagram example "Organizational culture" was redesigned using the ConceptDraw PRO diagramming and vector drawing software from Wikimedia Commons file Organization_Triangle.png. [commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Organization_Triangle.png]
This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 2.5 Generic license. [creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.5/deed.en]
The triangular chart sample "Organizational culture" is included in the Pyramid Diagrams solution from the Marketing area of ConceptDraw Solution Park. Read more
Pyramid diagram
Pyramid diagram, triangle diagram, triangular diagram, triangle chart, triangular chart, triangle scheme, triangular scheme,
HelpDesk

How to Draw a Matrix Organizational Chart with ConceptDraw PRO

There are a number of moments which are influenced on how the organizational structure of a certain business needs to be, how complex, and which type it should keep. The matrix organizational structure is atypical because it brings together employees and managers from different departments to work toward accomplishing a goal. This structure is commonly found in businesses that have more than one line of reportage. For instance, a company might contain an engineering department with engineering managers who workers report to. However, these workers might also have to liaise with different product or project managers depending on current tasks. Some form of matrix organization is found in most large-scale modern businesses. It is one of the most complicated reporting structures. You can easily build a clear matrix organizational chart in ConceptDraw PRO using templates from ConceptDraw Solution Park. Read more