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UML use case diagram - Ticket processing system

"An example scenario is presented to demonstrate how a common issue tracking system would work:
(1) A customer service technician receives a telephone call, email, or other communication from a customer about a problem. Some applications provide built-in messaging system and automatic error reporting from exception handling blocks.
(2) The technician verifies that the problem is real, and not just perceived. The technician will also ensure that enough information about the problem is obtained from the customer. This information generally includes the environment of the customer, when and how the issue occurs, and all other relevant circumstances.
(3) The technician creates the issue in the system, entering all relevant data, as provided by the customer.
(4) As work is done on that issue, the system is updated with new data by the technician. Any attempt at fixing the problem should be noted in the issue system. Ticket status most likely will be changed from open to pending.
(5) After the issue has been fully addressed, it is marked as resolved in the issue tracking system.
If the problem is not fully resolved, the ticket will be reopened once the technician receives new information from the customer. A Run Book Automation process that implements best practices for these workflows and increases IT personnel effectiveness is becoming very common." [Issue tracking system. Wikipedia]
The UML use case diagram example "Ticket processing system" was created using the ConceptDraw PRO diagramming and vector drawing software extended with the Rapid UML solution from the Software Development area of ConceptDraw Solution Park. Read more
UML use case diagram
UML use case diagram, use case, system boundary, actor,
"A catalog merchant (catalogue merchant in British and Canadian English) is a form of retailing. The typical merchant sells a wide variety of household and personal products, with many emphasizing jewelry. Unlike a self-serve retail store, most of the items are not displayed; customers select the products from printed catalogs in the store and fill out an order form. The order is brought to the sales counter, where a clerk retrieves the items from the warehouse area to a payment and checkout station. ...
The catalog merchant has generally lower prices than other retailers and lower overhead expenses due to the smaller size of store and lack of large showroom space.
There are a few key benefits to this approach. By operating as an in-store catalog sales center, it could be exempt from the "Resale price maintenance" policy of the manufacturers, which can force conventional retailers to charge a minimum sales price to prevent price-cutting competition; it also reduces the risk of merchandise theft, known in the industry as shrinkage.
From the consumer's point of view, there are potential advantages and disadvantages. The catalog showroom approach allows customers to shop without having to carry their purchases throughout the store as they shop. Possible downsides include that customers may be required to give their contact information when an order is placed, take the time to fill out order forms, and wait a period of time for their order to be available for purchase. This wait may be days long, one of the chief vulnerabilities of the catalog showroom approach." [Catalog merchant. Wikipedia]
The UML use case diagram example "System of goods selling via catalogues" was created using the ConceptDraw PRO diagramming and vector drawing software extended with the Rapid UML solution from the Software Development area of ConceptDraw Solution Park. Read more
UML use case diagram
UML use case diagram, use case, system boundary, actor,
"Banks offer many different channels to access their banking and other services:
(1) Automated Teller Machines.
(2) A branch is a retail location.
(3) Call center.
(4) Mail: most banks accept cheque deposits via mail and use mail to communicate to their customers, e.g. by sending out statements.
(5) Mobile banking is a method of using one's mobile phone to conduct banking transactions.
(6) Online banking is a term used for performing multiple transactions, payments etc. over the Internet.
(7) Relationship Managers, mostly for private banking or business banking, often visiting customers at their homes or businesses.
(8) Telephone banking is a service which allows its customers to conduct transactions over the telephone with automated attendant or when requested with telephone operator.
(9) Video banking is a term used for performing banking transactions or professional banking consultations via a remote video and audio connection. Video banking can be performed via purpose built banking transaction machines (similar to an Automated teller machine), or via a video conference enabled bank branch clarification.
(10) DSA is a Direct Selling Agent, who works for the bank based on a contract. Its main job is to increase the customer base for the bank." [Bank. Wikipedia]
The UML use case diagram example "Banking system" was created using the ConceptDraw PRO diagramming and vector drawing software extended with the Rapid UML solution from the Software Development area of ConceptDraw Solution Park. Read more
UML use case diagram
UML use case diagram, use case, actor,
HelpDesk

How to Create a Bank ATM Use Case Diagram

UML diagrams are often used in banking management for documenting a banking system. In particular, the interaction of bank customers with an automated teller machine (ATM) can be represented in a Use Case diagram. Before the software code for an ATM, or any other system design, is written, it is necessary to create a visual representation of any object-oriented processes. This is done most effectively by creating a Unified Modeling Language (UML) diagram, using object-oriented modeling. UML works as a general purpose modeling language for software engineers or system analysts, offering a number of different diagram styles with which to visually depict all aspects of a software system. ConceptDraw PRO diagramming software, enhanced and expanded with the ATM UML Diagrams solution, offers the full range of icons, templates and design elements needed to faithfully represent ATM and banking information system architecture using UML standards. The ATM UML Diagrams solution is useful for beginner and advanced users alike. More experienced users will appreciate a full range of vector stencil libraries and ConceptDraw PRO's powerful software, that allows you to create your ATM UML diagram in a matter of moments. Read more

Use Case Diagrams technology with ConceptDraw PRO

Use case diagrams are used at the development of software and systems for definition of functional system requirements or system of systems. Use case diagram presents the consecution of object’s actions (user’s or system’s) which are executed for reaching the definite result. Read more
This example of bank ATM UML activity diagram was created on the base of UML use case diagram of automated teller machine from the course "Thinking in Java, 2nd edition, Revision 9" by Bruce Eckel published on the website of the Computer Science and Electrical Engineering Department of the University of Maryland, Baltimore (UMBC).
"If you are designing an auto-teller, for example, the use case for a particular aspect of the functionality of the system is able to describe what the auto-teller does in every possible situation. Each of these “situations” is referred to as a scenario, and a use case can be considered a collection of scenarios. You can think of a scenario as a question that starts with: “What does the system do if...?” For example, “What does the auto-teller do if a customer has just deposited a check within the last 24 hours, and there’s not enough in the account without the check having cleared to provide a desired withdrawal?”
Use case diagrams are intentionally simple to prevent you from getting bogged down in system implementation details prematurely...
Each stick person represents an “actor,” which is typically a human or some other kind of free agent. (These can even be other computer systems, as is the case with “ATM.”) The box represents the boundary of your system. The ellipses represent the use cases, which are descriptions of valuable work that can be performed with the system. The lines between the actors and the use cases represent the interactions.
It doesn’t matter how the system is actually implemented, as long as it looks like this to the user."
[csee.umbc.edu/courses/331/resources/tij/text/TIJ213.gif]
This automated teller machine (ATM) UML use case diagram example was created using the ConceptDraw PRO diagramming and vector drawing software extended with the ATM UML Diagrams solution from the Software Development area of ConceptDraw Solution Park. Read more
Bank ATM UML sequence diagram
Bank ATM UML sequence diagram, use case, subject, system boundary, association, actor,