UML sequence diagram - GET request

"Request methods.
An HTTP 1.1 request made using telnet. The request, response headers and response body are highlighted.
HTTP defines methods (sometimes referred to as verbs) to indicate the desired action to be performed on the identified resource. What this resource represents, whether pre-existing data or data that is generated dynamically, depends on the implementation of the server. Often, the resource corresponds to a file or the output of an executable residing on the server. The HTTP/1.0 specification:section 8 defined the GET, POST and HEAD methods and the HTTP/1.1 specification:section 9 added 5 new methods: OPTIONS, PUT, DELETE, TRACE and CONNECT. By being specified in these documents their semantics are well known and can be depended upon. Any client can use any method and the server can be configured to support any combination of methods. If a method is unknown to an intermediate it will be treated as an unsafe and non-idempotent method. There is no limit to the number of methods that can be defined and this allows for future methods to be specified without breaking existing infrastructure. For example, WebDAV defined 7 new methods and RFC5789 specified the PATCH method.
GET.
Requests a representation of the specified resource. Requests using GET should only retrieve data and should have no other effect. (This is also true of some other HTTP methods.)" [Hypertext Transfer Protocol. Wikipedia]
The UML sequence diagram example "GET request" was created using the ConceptDraw PRO diagramming and vector drawing software extended with the Rapid UML solution from the Software Development area of ConceptDraw Solution Park. Read more
UML sequence diagram
UML sequence diagram, lifeline, initiator, execution occurrence,
The vector stencils library "Bank UML sequence diagram" contains 34 shapes for drawing UML sequence diagrams.
Use it for object-oriented modeling of your bank information system.
"A sequence diagram shows, as parallel vertical lines (lifelines), different processes or objects that live simultaneously, and, as horizontal arrows, the messages exchanged between them, in the order in which they occur. This allows the specification of simple runtime scenarios in a graphical manner.
Diagram building blocks.
If the lifeline is that of an object, it demonstrates a role. Leaving the instance name blank can represent anonymous and unnamed instances.
Messages, written with horizontal arrows with the message name written above them, display interaction. Solid arrow heads represent synchronous calls, open arrow heads represent asynchronous messages, and dashed lines represent reply messages. ...
Activation boxes, or method-call boxes, are opaque rectangles drawn on top of lifelines to represent that processes are being performed in response to the message (ExecutionSpecifications in UML).
Objects calling methods on themselves use messages and add new activation boxes on top of any others to indicate a further level of processing.
When an object is destroyed (removed from memory), an X is drawn on top of the lifeline, and the dashed line ceases to be drawn below it ...
A message sent from outside the diagram can be represented by a message originating from a filled-in circle (found message in UML) or from a border of the sequence diagram (gate in UML)." [Sequence diagram. Wikipedia]
This example of UML sequence diagram symbols for the ConceptDraw PRO diagramming and vector drawing software is included in the ATM UML Diagrams solution from the Software Development area of ConceptDraw Solution Park. Read more
UML sequence diagram symbols
UML sequence diagram symbols, weak sequencing combined fragment, interaction operator seq, synchronous call, strict sequencing combined fragment, interaction operator strict, state invariant, constraint, reply message, parallel combined fragment, interaction operator par, option combined fragment, interaction operator opt, note, negative combined fragment, interaction operator neg, message to self, self message, self delegation, lost message, loop combined fragment, interaction operator loop, lifeline, interaction use, combined fragment, interaction operand, interaction constraint, gate, frame, found message, execution specification, entity, lifeline, destruction event, delete message, critical region combined fragment, interaction operator critical, create message, control, lifeline, continuation, state invariant, consider combined fragment, interaction operator consider, concurrent, comment note, break combined fragment, interaction operator break, boundary, lifeline, asynchronous call, assertion combined fragment, interaction operator assert, alternative combined fragment, interaction operator alt, alternatives, actor, lifeline,
"A payment is the transfer of an item of value from one party (such as a person or company) to another in exchange for the provision of goods, services or both, or to fulfill a legal obligation. ...
Payment methods.
There are two types of payment methods; exchanging and provisioning. Exchanging is to change coin, money and banknote in terms of the price. Provisioning is to transfer money from one account to another. In this method, a third party must be involved. Credit card, debit card, Cheques, money transfers, and recurring cash or ACH (Automated Clearing House) disbursements are all electronic payments methods. Electronic payments technologies are magnetic stripe card, smartcard, contactless card and mobile handset. Mobile handset based payments are called mobile payments." [Payment. Wikipedia]
The UML activity diagram example "Payment process" was created using the ConceptDraw PRO diagramming and vector drawing software extended with the Rapid UML solution from the Software Development area of ConceptDraw Solution Park. Read more
UML activity diagram
UML activity diagram, swimlane, initial, frame, final, action,