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UML sequence diagram - Ticket processing system

"An example scenario is presented to demonstrate how a common issue tracking system would work:
(1) A customer service technician receives a telephone call, email, or other communication from a customer about a problem. Some applications provide built-in messaging system and automatic error reporting from exception handling blocks.
(2) The technician verifies that the problem is real, and not just perceived. The technician will also ensure that enough information about the problem is obtained from the customer. This information generally includes the environment of the customer, when and how the issue occurs, and all other relevant circumstances.
(3) The technician creates the issue in the system, entering all relevant data, as provided by the customer.
(4) As work is done on that issue, the system is updated with new data by the technician. Any attempt at fixing the problem should be noted in the issue system. Ticket status most likely will be changed from open to pending.
(5) After the issue has been fully addressed, it is marked as resolved in the issue tracking system.
If the problem is not fully resolved, the ticket will be reopened once the technician receives new information from the customer. A Run Book Automation process that implements best practices for these workflows and increases IT personnel effectiveness is becoming very common." [Issue tracking system. Wikipedia]
The UML sequence diagram example "Ticket processing system" was created using the ConceptDraw PRO diagramming and vector drawing software extended with the Rapid UML solution from the Software Development area of ConceptDraw Solution Park. Read more
UML sequence diagram
UML sequence diagram, lifeline, actor, lifeline, execution occurrence,
The vector stencils library "Bank UML sequence diagram" contains 34 shapes for drawing UML sequence diagrams.
Use it for object-oriented modeling of your bank information system.
"A sequence diagram shows, as parallel vertical lines (lifelines), different processes or objects that live simultaneously, and, as horizontal arrows, the messages exchanged between them, in the order in which they occur. This allows the specification of simple runtime scenarios in a graphical manner.
Diagram building blocks.
If the lifeline is that of an object, it demonstrates a role. Leaving the instance name blank can represent anonymous and unnamed instances.
Messages, written with horizontal arrows with the message name written above them, display interaction. Solid arrow heads represent synchronous calls, open arrow heads represent asynchronous messages, and dashed lines represent reply messages. ...
Activation boxes, or method-call boxes, are opaque rectangles drawn on top of lifelines to represent that processes are being performed in response to the message (ExecutionSpecifications in UML).
Objects calling methods on themselves use messages and add new activation boxes on top of any others to indicate a further level of processing.
When an object is destroyed (removed from memory), an X is drawn on top of the lifeline, and the dashed line ceases to be drawn below it ...
A message sent from outside the diagram can be represented by a message originating from a filled-in circle (found message in UML) or from a border of the sequence diagram (gate in UML)." [Sequence diagram. Wikipedia]
This example of UML sequence diagram symbols for the ConceptDraw PRO diagramming and vector drawing software is included in the ATM UML Diagrams solution from the Software Development area of ConceptDraw Solution Park. Read more
UML sequence diagram symbols
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This example of bank ATM UML activity diagram was created on the base of UML use case diagram of automated teller machine from the course "Thinking in Java, 2nd edition, Revision 9" by Bruce Eckel published on the website of the Computer Science and Electrical Engineering Department of the University of Maryland, Baltimore (UMBC).
"If you are designing an auto-teller, for example, the use case for a particular aspect of the functionality of the system is able to describe what the auto-teller does in every possible situation. Each of these “situations” is referred to as a scenario, and a use case can be considered a collection of scenarios. You can think of a scenario as a question that starts with: “What does the system do if...?” For example, “What does the auto-teller do if a customer has just deposited a check within the last 24 hours, and there’s not enough in the account without the check having cleared to provide a desired withdrawal?”
Use case diagrams are intentionally simple to prevent you from getting bogged down in system implementation details prematurely...
Each stick person represents an “actor,” which is typically a human or some other kind of free agent. (These can even be other computer systems, as is the case with “ATM.”) The box represents the boundary of your system. The ellipses represent the use cases, which are descriptions of valuable work that can be performed with the system. The lines between the actors and the use cases represent the interactions.
It doesn’t matter how the system is actually implemented, as long as it looks like this to the user."
[csee.umbc.edu/courses/331/resources/tij/text/TIJ213.gif]
This automated teller machine (ATM) UML use case diagram example was created using the ConceptDraw PRO diagramming and vector drawing software extended with the ATM UML Diagrams solution from the Software Development area of ConceptDraw Solution Park. Read more
Bank ATM UML sequence diagram
Bank ATM UML sequence diagram, use case, subject, system boundary, association, actor,