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Design elements - Delay elements

The vector stencils library "Delay elements" contains 12 symbols of delay elements for drawing electrical schematics and electronic circuit diagrams.
"An analog delay line is a network of electrical components connected in series, where each individual element creates a time difference or phase change between its input signal and its output signal. It operates on analog signals whose amplitude varies continuously. An example is a bucket-brigade device. Other types of delay line include acoustic, magnetostrictive, and surface acoustic wave devices. A series of RC networks can be cascaded to form a delay. A long transmission line can also provide a delay element. The delay time of an analog delay line may be only a few nanoseconds or several milliseconds, limited by the practical size of the physical medium used to delay the signal and the propagation speed of impulses in the medium." [Analog delay line. Wikipedia]
The symbols example "Design elements - Delay elements" was drawn using the ConceptDraw PRO diagramming and vector drawing software extended with the Electrical Engineering solution from the Engineering area of ConceptDraw Solution Park. Read more
Delay element symbols
Delay element symbols, delay element,
The vector stencils library "MOSFET" contains 18 symbols of MOSFET (metal–oxide–semiconductor field-effect transistor) elements for drawing electronic circuits diagrams.
"A variety of symbols are used for the MOSFET. The basic design is generally a line for the channel with the source and drain leaving it at right angles and then bending back at right angles into the same direction as the channel. Sometimes three line segments are used for enhancement mode and a solid line for depletion mode. ... Another line is drawn parallel to the channel for the gate.
The "bulk" or "body" connection, if shown, is shown connected to the back of the channel with an arrow indicating PMOS or NMOS. Arrows always point from P to N, so an NMOS (N-channel in P-well or P-substrate) has the arrow pointing in (from the bulk to the channel). If the bulk is connected to the source (as is generally the case with discrete devices) it is sometimes angled to meet up with the source leaving the transistor. If the bulk is not shown (as is often the case in IC design as they are generally common bulk) an inversion symbol is sometimes used to indicate PMOS, alternatively an arrow on the source may be used in the same way as for bipolar transistors (out for nMOS, in for pMOS). ...
For the symbols in which the bulk, or body, terminal is shown, it is here shown internally connected to the source... This is a typical configuration, but by no means the only important configuration. In general, the MOSFET is a four-terminal device, and in integrated circuits many of the MOSFETs share a body connection, not necessarily connected to the source terminals of all the transistors." [MOSFET. Wikipedia]
The symbols example "Design elements - MOSFET" was drawn using the ConceptDraw PRO diagramming and vector drawing software extended with the Electrical Engineering solution from the Engineering area of ConceptDraw Solution Park. Read more
MOSFET symbols
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The vector stencils library "Transmission paths" contains 43 symbols of power transmission paths, electronic circuits, bus connectors and elbows, terminals, junctions, and concentrators.
Use it to annotate electrical diagrams, electronic schematics and circuit diagrams.
"A physical medium in data communications is the transmission path over which a signal propagates.
Many transmission media are used as communications channel.
For telecommunications purposes in the United States, Federal Standard 1037C, transmission media are classified as one of the following:
(1) Guided (or bounded) - waves are guided along a solid medium such as a transmission line.
(2) Wireless (or unguided) - transmission and reception are achieved by means of an antenna.
One of the most common physical medias used in networking is copper wire. Copper wire to carry signals to long distances using relatively low amounts of power. The unshielded twisted pair (UTP) is eight strands of copper wire, organized into four pairs.
Another example of a physical medium is optical fiber, which has emerged as the most commonly used transmission medium for long-distance communications. Optical fiber is a thin strand of glass that guides light along its length.
Multimode and single mode are two types of commonly used optical fiber. Multimode fiber uses LEDs as the light source and can carry signals over shorter distances, about 2 kilometers. Single mode can carry signals over distances of tens of miles.
Wireless media may carry surface waves or skywaves, either longitudinally or transversely, and are so classified.
In both communications, communication is in the form of electromagnetic waves. With guided transmission media, the waves are guided along a physical path; examples of guided media include phone lines, twisted pair cables, coaxial cables, and optical fibers. Unguided transmission media are methods that allow the transmission of data without the use of physical means to define the path it takes. Examples of this include microwave, radio or infrared. Unguided media provide a means for transmitting electromagnetic waves but do not guide them; examples are propagation through air, vacuum and seawater.
The term direct link is used to refer to the transmission path between two devices in which signals propagate directly from transmitters to receivers with no intermediate devices, other than amplifiers or repeaters used to increase signal strength. This term can apply to both guided and unguided media.
A transmission may be simplex, half-duplex, or full-duplex.
In simplex transmission, signals are transmitted in only one direction; one station is a transmitter and the other is the receiver. In the half-duplex operation, both stations may transmit, but only one at a time. In full duplex operation, both stations may transmit simultaneously. In the latter case, the medium is carrying signals in both directions at same time." [Transmission medium. Wikipedia]
The shapes example "Design elements - Transmission paths" was drawn using the ConceptDraw PRO diagramming and vector drawing software extended with the Electrical Engineering solution from the Engineering area of ConceptDraw Solution Park. Read more
Transmission path symbols
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The vector stencils library "Qualifying" contains 56 qualifying symbols of radiation, polarity, phase, windings, wire, ground, connection, connector, coaxial, electret.
Use these signs to annotate or specify characteristics of objects in electrical drawings, electronic schematics, circuit diagrams, electromechanical drawings, and wiring diagrams, cabling layout diagrams.
"An electrical drawing, is a type of technical drawing that shows information about power, lighting, and communication for an engineering or architectural project. Any electrical working drawing consists of "lines, symbols, dimensions, and notations to accurately convey an engineering's design to the workers, who install the electrical system on the job".
A complete set of working drawings for the average electrical system in large projects usually consists of:
(1) A plot plan showing the building's location and outside electrical wiring.
(2) Floor plans showing the location of electrical systems on every floor.
(3) Power-riser diagrams showing panel boards.
(4) Control wiring diagrams.
(5) Schedules and other information in combination with construction drawings.
Electrical drafters prepare wiring and layout diagrams used by workers who erect, install, and repair electrical equipment and wiring in communication centers, power plants, electrical distribution systems, and buildings." [Electrical drawing. Wikipedia]
The signs example "Design elements - Qualifying" was drawn using the ConceptDraw PRO diagramming and vector drawing software extended with the Electrical Engineering solution from the Engineering area of ConceptDraw Solution Park. Read more
Qualifying symbols
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Garrett IA Diagrams with ConceptDraw PRO

Garrett IA diagrams are used at development of Internet-resources, in particulars at projecting of interactions of web-resource elements. The diagram of information architecture of the web resource which is constructed correctly with necessary details presents to developers the resource in comprehensible and visual way. Read more
This engineering drawing present weld type symbols and fillet weld symbols.
The weld type symbol is typically placed above or below the center of the reference line, depending on which side of the joint it's on. The symbol is interpreted as a simplified cross-section of the weld.
"Fillet welding refers to the process of joining two pieces of metal together whether they be perpendicular or at an angle. These welds are commonly referred to as Tee joints which are two pieces of metal perpendicular to each other or Lap joints which are two pieces of metal that overlap and are welded at the edges. The weld is aesthetically triangular in shape and may have a concave, flat or convex surface depending on the welder’s technique. Welders use fillet welds when connecting flanges to pipes, welding cross sections of infrastructure, and when fastening metal by bolts isn't strong enough." [Fillet weld. Wikipedia]
The engineering drawing example Welding symbols is included in the Mechanical Engineering solution from Engineering area of ConceptDraw Solution Park. Read more
Welding joint symbols
Welding joint symbols, square groove, insert, consumable insert, flare bevel groove, flared-bevel groove, flare V groove, flared-V groove, fillet, weld, cutaway, revealing detail, bevel groove, back, backing, arrow, V-groove, U-groove, J-groove,