Get Free Trial

Design elements - Power sources

The vector stencils library "Power sources" contains 9 element symbols of power sources and batteries for drawing the electrical schematics and electronic circuit diagrams.
"A power supply is a device that supplies electric power to an electrical load. The term is most commonly applied to electric power converters that convert one form of electrical energy to another, though it may also refer to devices that convert another form of energy (mechanical, chemical, solar) to electrical energy. A regulated power supply is one that controls the output voltage or current to a specific value; the controlled value is held nearly constant despite variations in either load current or the voltage supplied by the power supply's energy source.
Every power supply must obtain the energy it supplies to its load, as well as any energy it consumes while performing that task, from an energy source. Depending on its design, a power supply may obtain energy from:
(1) Electrical energy transmission systems. Common examples of this include power supplies that convert AC line voltage to DC voltage.
(2) Energy storage devices such as batteries and fuel cells.
(3) Electromechanical systems such as generators and alternators.
(4) Solar power." [Power supply. Wikipedia]
The shapes example "Design elements - Power sources" was drawn using the ConceptDraw PRO diagramming and vector drawing software extended with the Electrical Engineering solution from the Engineering area of ConceptDraw Solution Park. Read more
Power source symbols
Power source symbols, oscillator, alternating-current source, ideal source,  ideal voltage source, ideal source,  ideal current source, battery, DC source, DC voltage source, DC source, DC current source, AC source, AC voltage source, AC source, AC current source,

electrical diagram, electrical engineering, electrical schematic, electrical schematic symbols, electrical diagram symbols  Electrical Engineering

This solution extends ConceptDraw PRO v.9.5 (or later) with electrical engineering samples, electrical schematic symbols, electrical diagram symbols, templates and libraries of design elements, to help you design electrical schematics, digital and analog Read more
electrical diagram, electrical engineering, electrical schematic, electrical schematic symbols, electrical diagram symbols
The vector stencils library "Qualifying" contains 56 qualifying symbols of radiation, polarity, phase, windings, wire, ground, connection, connector, coaxial, electret.
Use these signs to annotate or specify characteristics of objects in electrical drawings, electronic schematics, circuit diagrams, electromechanical drawings, and wiring diagrams, cabling layout diagrams.
"An electrical drawing, is a type of technical drawing that shows information about power, lighting, and communication for an engineering or architectural project. Any electrical working drawing consists of "lines, symbols, dimensions, and notations to accurately convey an engineering's design to the workers, who install the electrical system on the job".
A complete set of working drawings for the average electrical system in large projects usually consists of:
(1) A plot plan showing the building's location and outside electrical wiring.
(2) Floor plans showing the location of electrical systems on every floor.
(3) Power-riser diagrams showing panel boards.
(4) Control wiring diagrams.
(5) Schedules and other information in combination with construction drawings.
Electrical drafters prepare wiring and layout diagrams used by workers who erect, install, and repair electrical equipment and wiring in communication centers, power plants, electrical distribution systems, and buildings." [Electrical drawing. Wikipedia]
The signs example "Design elements - Qualifying" was drawn using the ConceptDraw PRO diagramming and vector drawing software extended with the Electrical Engineering solution from the Engineering area of ConceptDraw Solution Park. Read more
Qualifying symbols
Qualifying symbols, special connector, cable indicator, radiation, radiation travel, direction, positive polarity, phase, windings, wire, connection, zigzag, phase, windings, wire, connection, star, phase, windings, wire, connection, polygon, phase, windings, wire, connection, fork, phase, windings, wire, connection, double star, phase, windings, wire, connection, double delta, phase, windings, wire, connection, delta, phase, windings, wire, connection, neutral, conductor, negative polarity, multiple-phase, electret, coaxial line, coaxial,
The vector stencils library "Transmission paths" contains 43 symbols of power transmission paths, electronic circuits, bus connectors and elbows, terminals, junctions, and concentrators.
Use it to annotate electrical diagrams, electronic schematics and circuit diagrams.
"A physical medium in data communications is the transmission path over which a signal propagates.
Many transmission media are used as communications channel.
For telecommunications purposes in the United States, Federal Standard 1037C, transmission media are classified as one of the following:
(1) Guided (or bounded) - waves are guided along a solid medium such as a transmission line.
(2) Wireless (or unguided) - transmission and reception are achieved by means of an antenna.
One of the most common physical medias used in networking is copper wire. Copper wire to carry signals to long distances using relatively low amounts of power. The unshielded twisted pair (UTP) is eight strands of copper wire, organized into four pairs.
Another example of a physical medium is optical fiber, which has emerged as the most commonly used transmission medium for long-distance communications. Optical fiber is a thin strand of glass that guides light along its length.
Multimode and single mode are two types of commonly used optical fiber. Multimode fiber uses LEDs as the light source and can carry signals over shorter distances, about 2 kilometers. Single mode can carry signals over distances of tens of miles.
Wireless media may carry surface waves or skywaves, either longitudinally or transversely, and are so classified.
In both communications, communication is in the form of electromagnetic waves. With guided transmission media, the waves are guided along a physical path; examples of guided media include phone lines, twisted pair cables, coaxial cables, and optical fibers. Unguided transmission media are methods that allow the transmission of data without the use of physical means to define the path it takes. Examples of this include microwave, radio or infrared. Unguided media provide a means for transmitting electromagnetic waves but do not guide them; examples are propagation through air, vacuum and seawater.
The term direct link is used to refer to the transmission path between two devices in which signals propagate directly from transmitters to receivers with no intermediate devices, other than amplifiers or repeaters used to increase signal strength. This term can apply to both guided and unguided media.
A transmission may be simplex, half-duplex, or full-duplex.
In simplex transmission, signals are transmitted in only one direction; one station is a transmitter and the other is the receiver. In the half-duplex operation, both stations may transmit, but only one at a time. In full duplex operation, both stations may transmit simultaneously. In the latter case, the medium is carrying signals in both directions at same time." [Transmission medium. Wikipedia]
The shapes example "Design elements - Transmission paths" was drawn using the ConceptDraw PRO diagramming and vector drawing software extended with the Electrical Engineering solution from the Engineering area of ConceptDraw Solution Park. Read more
Transmission path symbols
Transmission path symbols, transmission path, terminal, 3-phase, terminal, straight, bus, point, overground, weatherproof, enclosure, optical fiber, line, cable, underground, line, cable, submarine, line, cable, overhead, line, cable, loaded, line, cable, coaxial, line concentrator, lead group, label, path, elbow, bus, direction, flow, transmission path, cable group, cable, conductor, bus, width, anticreep device, cable, 8-line, bus, straight bus connector, 8-line, bus, elbow, 4-line, bus, straight bus connector, 4-line, bus, elbow, 3-line, bus, elbow, 3-line bus, 3-channel, straight bus connector, 2-line, bus, elbow, 2-line bus, 2-channel, straight bus connector,
The vector stencils library "Transformers and windings" contains 29 element symbols of transformers, windings, couplers, metering devices, transductors, magnetic cores, chokes, and a variometer.
Use it to design the electromechanical device schematics and electronic circuit diagrams.
"A transformer is an electrical device that transfers energy between two circuits through electromagnetic induction. Transformers may be used in step-up or step-down voltage conversion, which 'transforms' an AC voltage from one voltage level on the input of the device to another level at the output terminals. This special function of transformers can provide control of specified requirements of current level as an alternating current source, or it may be used for impedance matching between mismatched electrical circuits to effect maximum power transfer between the circuits.
A transformer most commonly consists of two windings of wire that are wound around a common core to induce tight electromagnetic coupling between the windings. The core material is often a laminated iron core. The coil that receives the electrical input energy is referred to as the primary winding, while the output coil is called the secondary winding.
An alternating electric current flowing through the primary winding (coil) of a transformer generates an electromagnetic field in its surroundings and a varying magnetic flux in the core of the transformer. By electromagnetic induction this magnetic flux generates a varying electromotive force in the secondary winding, resulting in a voltage across the output terminals. If a load impedance is connected across the secondary winding, a current flows through the secondary winding drawing power from the primary winding and its power source." [Transformer. Wikipedia]
"An electromagnetic coil (or simply a "coil") is formed when a conductor is wound around a core or form to create an inductor or electromagnet. When electricity is passed through a coil, it generates a magnetic field. One loop of wire is usually referred to as a turn or a winding, and a coil consists of one or more turns. For use in an electronic circuit, electrical connection terminals called taps are often connected to a coil. Coils are often coated with varnish or wrapped with insulating tape to provide additional insulation and secure them in place. A completed coil assembly with one or more set of coils and taps is often called the windings.
Windings are used in transformers, electric motors, inductors, solenoids, loudspeakers, and many other applications." [Electromagnetic coil. Wikipedia]
The shapes example "Design elements - Transformers and windings" was drawn using the ConceptDraw PRO diagramming and vector drawing software extended with the Electrical Engineering solution from the Engineering area of ConceptDraw Solution Park. Read more
Transformer and winding symbols
Transformer and winding symbols, variometer, triplex, induction voltage regulator, transformer, magnetic-core, mutual inductor, transformer, magnetic-core, 2 windings, adjustable, transformer, magnetic-core, 1 winding, adjustable, transformer, magnetic-core, transformer, air-core, mutual inductor, transformer, air-core, 2 windings, adjustable, transformer, air-core, 1 winding, adjustable, transformer, air-core, transformer, transductor, saturating transformer, potential transformer, winding, potential transformer, outdoor metering device, magnetic core, linear coupler, induction voltage regulator, current transformer, bushing-type, current transformer, coaxial choke, magnetic core, choke, reactor, adjustable transformer, 1 winding, adjustable transformer,  mutual inductor, 1-phase, induction voltage regulator,
The vector stencils library "Transistors" contains 30 symbols of transistors drawing electronic schematics and circuit diagrams.
"A transistor is a semiconductor device used to amplify and switch electronic signals and electrical power. It is composed of semiconductor material with at least three terminals for connection to an external circuit. A voltage or current applied to one pair of the transistor's terminals changes the current through another pair of terminals. Because the controlled (output) power can be higher than the controlling (input) power, a transistor can amplify a signal. Today, some transistors are packaged individually, but many more are found embedded in integrated circuits.
The transistor is the fundamental building block of modern electronic devices, and is ubiquitous in modern electronic systems. ...
Transistors are categorized by:
(1) Semiconductor material...: the metalloids germanium ... and silicon ... in amorphous, polycrystalline and monocrystalline form; the compounds gallium arsenide ... and silicon carbide ..., the alloy silicon-germanium ..., the allotrope of carbon graphene ...
(2) Structure: BJT, JFET, IGFET (MOSFET), insulated-gate bipolar transistor, "other types"
(3) Electrical polarity (positive and negative): n–p–n, p–n–p (BJTs); n-channel, p-channel (FETs)
(4) Maximum power rating: low, medium, high
(5) Maximum operating frequency: low, medium, high, radio (RF), microwave frequency...
(6) Application: switch, general purpose, audio, high voltage, super-beta, matched pair
(7) Physical packaging: through-hole metal, through-hole plastic, surface mount, ball grid array, power modules...
(8) Amplification factor..." [Transistor. Wikipedia]
The shapes example "Design elements - Transistors" was drawn using the ConceptDraw PRO diagramming and vector drawing software extended with the Electrical Engineering solution from the Engineering area of ConceptDraw Solution Park. Read more
Transistor symbols
Transistor symbols, unijunction FET, P-type channel, unijunction FET, N-type channel, transistor with transverse biased base, PNP, transistor with transverse biased base, NPN, transistor with ohmic connection to the intrinsic region, PNIP, transistor with ohmic connection to the intrinsic region, PNIN, transistor with ohmic connection to the intrinsic region, NPIP, transistor with ohmic connection to the intrinsic region, NPIN, transistor latch, junction, FET, field-effect transistorl, P-type channel, junction, FET, field-effect transistor, P-type channel, junction, FET, field-effect transistor, N-type channel, bipolar transistor, bipolar junction transistor, BJT, PNP, bipolar transistor, bipolar junction transistor, BJT, NPN, Darlington transistor, PNP, Darlington transistor, NPN,