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Design elements - Power sources

The vector stencils library "Power sources" contains 9 element symbols of power sources and batteries for drawing the electrical schematics and electronic circuit diagrams.
"A power supply is a device that supplies electric power to an electrical load. The term is most commonly applied to electric power converters that convert one form of electrical energy to another, though it may also refer to devices that convert another form of energy (mechanical, chemical, solar) to electrical energy. A regulated power supply is one that controls the output voltage or current to a specific value; the controlled value is held nearly constant despite variations in either load current or the voltage supplied by the power supply's energy source.
Every power supply must obtain the energy it supplies to its load, as well as any energy it consumes while performing that task, from an energy source. Depending on its design, a power supply may obtain energy from:
(1) Electrical energy transmission systems. Common examples of this include power supplies that convert AC line voltage to DC voltage.
(2) Energy storage devices such as batteries and fuel cells.
(3) Electromechanical systems such as generators and alternators.
(4) Solar power." [Power supply. Wikipedia]
The shapes example "Design elements - Power sources" was drawn using the ConceptDraw PRO diagramming and vector drawing software extended with the Electrical Engineering solution from the Engineering area of ConceptDraw Solution Park. Read more
Power source symbols
Power source symbols, oscillator, alternating-current source, ideal source,  ideal voltage source, ideal source,  ideal current source, battery, DC source, DC voltage source, DC source, DC current source, AC source, AC voltage source, AC source, AC current source,
The vector stencils library "Transformers and windings" contains 29 element symbols of transformers, windings, couplers, metering devices, transductors, magnetic cores, chokes, and a variometer.
Use it to design the electromechanical device schematics and electronic circuit diagrams.
"A transformer is an electrical device that transfers energy between two circuits through electromagnetic induction. Transformers may be used in step-up or step-down voltage conversion, which 'transforms' an AC voltage from one voltage level on the input of the device to another level at the output terminals. This special function of transformers can provide control of specified requirements of current level as an alternating current source, or it may be used for impedance matching between mismatched electrical circuits to effect maximum power transfer between the circuits.
A transformer most commonly consists of two windings of wire that are wound around a common core to induce tight electromagnetic coupling between the windings. The core material is often a laminated iron core. The coil that receives the electrical input energy is referred to as the primary winding, while the output coil is called the secondary winding.
An alternating electric current flowing through the primary winding (coil) of a transformer generates an electromagnetic field in its surroundings and a varying magnetic flux in the core of the transformer. By electromagnetic induction this magnetic flux generates a varying electromotive force in the secondary winding, resulting in a voltage across the output terminals. If a load impedance is connected across the secondary winding, a current flows through the secondary winding drawing power from the primary winding and its power source." [Transformer. Wikipedia]
"An electromagnetic coil (or simply a "coil") is formed when a conductor is wound around a core or form to create an inductor or electromagnet. When electricity is passed through a coil, it generates a magnetic field. One loop of wire is usually referred to as a turn or a winding, and a coil consists of one or more turns. For use in an electronic circuit, electrical connection terminals called taps are often connected to a coil. Coils are often coated with varnish or wrapped with insulating tape to provide additional insulation and secure them in place. A completed coil assembly with one or more set of coils and taps is often called the windings.
Windings are used in transformers, electric motors, inductors, solenoids, loudspeakers, and many other applications." [Electromagnetic coil. Wikipedia]
The shapes example "Design elements - Transformers and windings" was drawn using the ConceptDraw PRO diagramming and vector drawing software extended with the Electrical Engineering solution from the Engineering area of ConceptDraw Solution Park. Read more
Transformer and winding symbols
Transformer and winding symbols, variometer, triplex, induction voltage regulator, transformer, magnetic-core, mutual inductor, transformer, magnetic-core, 2 windings, adjustable, transformer, magnetic-core, 1 winding, adjustable, transformer, magnetic-core, transformer, air-core, mutual inductor, transformer, air-core, 2 windings, adjustable, transformer, air-core, 1 winding, adjustable, transformer, air-core, transformer, transductor, saturating transformer, potential transformer, winding, potential transformer, outdoor metering device, magnetic core, linear coupler, induction voltage regulator, current transformer, bushing-type, current transformer, coaxial choke, magnetic core, choke, reactor, adjustable transformer, 1 winding, adjustable transformer,  mutual inductor, 1-phase, induction voltage regulator,
The vector stenvils library "Outlets" contains 57 symbols of electrical outlets for drawing building interior design, electrical floor plans and layouts of AC power plugs and sockets.
"AC power plugs and sockets are devices that allow electrically operated equipment to be connected to the primary alternating current (AC) power supply in a building. Electrical plugs and sockets differ in voltage and current rating, shape, size and type of connectors. The types used in each country are set by national standards, some of which are listed in the IEC technical report TR 60083, Plugs and socket-outlets for domestic and similar general use standardized in member countries of IEC.
Plugs and sockets for portable appliances started becoming available in the 1880s, to replace connections to light sockets with easier to use wall-mounted outlets. A proliferation of types developed to address the issues of convenience and protection from electric shock. Today there are approximately 20 types in common use around the world, and many obsolete socket types are still found in older buildings. Co-ordination of technical standards has allowed some types of plugs to be used over wide regions to facilitate trade in electrical appliances, and for the convenience of travellers and consumers of imported electrical goods. Some multi-standard sockets allow use of several different types of plugs; improvised or unapproved adapters between incompatible sockets and plugs may not provide the full safety and performance of an approved adapter." [AC power plugs and sockets. Wikipedia]
The example "Design elements - Outlets" was created using the ConceptDraw PRO diagramming and vector drawing software extended with the Electric and Telecom Plans solution from the Building plans area of ConceptDraw Solution Park. Read more
Electrical outlet symbols
Electrical outlet symbols, weatherproof phone outlet, weatherproof convenience outlet, weatherproof TV outlet, wall phone outlet, wall mounted, data, telephone, outlet, wall mounted, data outlet, vapor discharge lamp outlet, triplex outlet, television outlet, telephone outlet, switch, convenience outlet, split wired, triplex outlet, split wired, duplex outlet, special-purpose outlet, special-purpose connection, provision for connection, single outlet, switch, single outlet, range outlet, radio, convenience outlet, radio outlet, quadruplex outlet, pull switch, phone feed, multi-purpose outlet, multi-outlet assembly, local area network outlet, LAN outlet, lamp holder, pull switch, lamp holder, junction box, heavy duty outlet, convenience outlet, heavy duty outlet, floor special-purpose outlet, floor receptacle, floor phone outlet, floor mounted, outlet, floor TV outlet, fiber outlet, fax outlet, fan outlet, exit light outlet, emergency circuit single outlet, emergency circuit quadruplex outlet, emergency circuit duplex outlet, electrical outlet, duplex special-purpose outlet, duplex ground fault interrupter, duplex convenience outlet, drop outlet, door phone outlet, dedicated duplex outlet, data, voice, power, floor mounted, outlet, computer data outlet, clock hanger outlet, mounted , blanked outlet, TV, phone, outlet, TV feed, 240v outlet,

Network Layout

The Network Layout Diagram visually illustrates the arrangement of computers, nodes and other network appliances, such as servers, printers, routers, switches, hubs, and their relationships between each other. The network layout and placement of servers greatly influence on the network security and network performance. Elaboration of robust Network Layout Diagram is especially important when visualizing already existing network in order to understand its complexity; when troubleshooting the network issues; designing, documenting and implementing new network configurations; extending, modifying, or moving an existing network to other location. Through the careful thinking the network plan and designing the clear Network Layout Diagram, you can be confident in result on the stage of network implementation and to solve faster the problems appearing in network infrastructure. ConceptDraw PRO enhanced with Computer Network Diagrams solution from Computer and Networks area perfectly suits for drawing Network Layout Diagrams for different network topologies. Read more